Casey

“(Feminism & porn) go hand in hand.”

Name?

Casey Calvert.

Where did you grow up?

Gainesville, FL.

Were you brought up religiously, secularly or other?

I was raised conservative Jewish. We went to synagogue every Saturday morning, and I had a Bat Mitzvah. But after that, my family switched to a reform synagogue where my younger brother had his Bar Mitzvah and attendance for us was only on the holidays.

Was there turbulence throughout your childhood/adolescence?

In the moment, as a child, sure, there were plenty of times when I felt like the world was ending. But now, I look back and think about how blessed I was to have such an easy childhood. There’s not a single thing I would change.

Were you ever embarrassed about your development/puberty? If so why?

I think I was embarrassed like all girls are when things start changing. My peers made fun of me for not wearing (or really, needing) a bra. And I have a distinct memory of a good friend telling me how embarrassing it was for her that I wore full-bottom panties and not a thong (I started wearing thongs shortly after). But overall, the embarrassment didn’t come from external factors. It came from within. I felt awkward with my adult body from the time it started growing until I was 21.

Can you remember any key moments in your formative years that shaped you?

I think that it’s hard to know the key moments that shaped me. I think that, maybe, everything that happened when I was a child influenced the way I am today. There’s definitely not one big thing I can tell you that really changed things for me.

Any that shaped your perspective of women?

All of the women in my life growing up were strong women. There was never a moment where I saw a woman being subjugated, so I never questioned women’s role in society. I grew up knowing that I could be and do whatever I wanted.

Of sexuality?

I can’t remember any formative moments for my sexuality. I wish I could. I would love to know where my paraphilias come from.

When did you become aware of your gender?

I’m not really sure. I think I’ve always just known I was a girl, without ever dramatically becoming aware of it.

When did you become aware of your own sexuality, were there any key moments?

I’ve known for as long as I can remember that my sexuality is different from other people’s sexuality. But I really became aware of it when I was 13 – when I saw porn for the first time. That’s when I realized that, yes, I’m different, but there are also a lot of people out there like me.

What, if any, are the obstacles you’ve overcome on your path to womanhood?

The only obstacle I’ve had to overcome was my own fear.

"The only obstacle I’ve had to overcome was my own fear." -Casey Photo by Jennifer Toole

“The only obstacle I’ve had to overcome was my own fear.” -Casey
Photo by Jennifer Toole

Have you ever struggled with your sexuality?

No. I’ve known my whole life exactly what turns me on.

Have you ever been embarrassed, burdened or ashamed of your sexuality? If so why?

I spent the majority of my life being ashamed of my sexuality. The fact that I fantasized about BDSM was my deep dark secret. The few times I dared tell my friends in adolescence ended in disaster. I didn’t stop feeling ashamed until I was 21, and decided to start exploring it, rather than hiding it.

How would you describe your personal experience, existing in the way you do, each day?

My personal experience is one of a young woman, who has an unusual job, but an otherwise fairly mundane life.

What is the image you would like to project?

I would like to project the image of a woman who is strong, intelligent, and confident in her sexuality.

What do you think the image other people perceive is?

I would like to think that most people perceive the image I would like to project, but I know that is being naïve. I know some people only see me as a dumb whore porn star, and that’s ok, because I know I do my best to undermine that stereotype.

What is your political stance on women’s reproductive rights?

I believe women should have equal reproductive rights to men. Women should have the right to choose whether or not they want to have children – they should have access to contraceptives and safe, legal abortion. Women should have the right to have men stay out of their uterus.

Are you pro-life or pro-choice?

I am pro-choice. I believe that a woman has the right to do what she wants with her body.

What are your feelings about contraceptives? Their availability, cost, stigma, usage?

Contraceptives are a very important thing, and they need to be made easily accessible to everyone at an affordable cost. I don’t believe in putting condoms behind the counter at the drug store, or employers denying insurance coverage for birth control pills.

What are your feelings on casual sex?

I see nothing wrong with casual sex as long as it is consensual.

Are you in a relationship(s)?

Yes, I am in a committed open relationship.

What are your feelings on marriage?

I believe in marriage as an institution that shows commitment between two people who love each other, no matter their gender.

What are your most positive relationships with other women?

My most positive relationships with other women are the ones where we have met under some sort of sexual circumstance. It doesn’t have to be work; it could just be in a BDSM context. I think these are my most positive relationships because neither one of us feels like we have to lie about certain topics.

What are your negative?

My most negative relationships with other women are the ones where she can’t see past my profession.

What does the word ‘woman’ mean to you?

The word ‘woman’ means, to me, someone who identifies with the female gender.

What are your feelings on monogamy?

I believe that some people are wired to be monogamous, and there is nothing wrong with that.

On polyamory?

In the same vein, I believe that some people are wired to be polyamorous, and there is nothing wrong with that.

Do you feel your choice to participate or not participate in consensual sex is at all affected by societal influence?

No, I do not feel influenced by society to alter my sexuality in any way.

How do you feel about products marketed to women?

I feel like the advertising for products for women could be improved to show a more realistic view, but this is a battle I choose not to fight. Advertising is an antiquated, dirty world, and I’m not hopeful for change.

How do you feel about feminine hygiene products’ portrayal in the media?

In the same vein, it’s not perfect, but I don’t really pay attention to it. I just buy tampons when I need them.

Were you always aware of what your body could do sexually & mechanically?

Mechanically, yes. I’ve been aware of what the different parts of my body can do physically for a long time. Sexually, no. I learn new things about what my body can do sexually all the time.

Do you feel your sexual education was sufficient?

Not really. I don’t really remember any real ‘sexual education.’ Some people came to my 7th grade science class and told us that if we couldn’t say “penis” without giggling we weren’t ready to have sex yet.

"The fact that I fantasized about BDSM was my deep dark secret. The few times I dared tell my friends in adolescence ended in disaster. I didn’t stop feeling ashamed until I was 21, and decided to start exploring it, rather than hiding it." -Casey Photo by Jennifer Toole

“The fact that I fantasized about BDSM was my deep dark secret. The few times I dared tell my friends in adolescence ended in disaster. I didn’t stop feeling ashamed until I was 21, and decided to start exploring it, rather than hiding it.” -Casey
Photo by Jennifer Toole

If not, what would you have done to make it so?

In my perfect fantasy world, all children receive sexual education in school. They don’t segregate the genders, because boys need to learn about female sexuality, and girls need to learn about male sexuality; classes are taught by doctors, not giggly volunteer college students or uncomfortable grade teachers. They teach anatomy, proper use of contraceptives, sexual health, and acceptance of those with alternative sexualities. Of course, they tailor the lessons to the age of the children, which is why I think sex ed needs to happen more than once, maybe in 5th grade, 7th grade and 11th grade. I also think homework should be assigned, so parents are forced to have conversations with their children. By the time a child graduates high school, they should understand things like the fact that condoms are the only contraceptive that protect against pregnancy and STDs, what the clitoris and prostate are (and what they do), and that there is no shame in communicating what one would like sexually, even if that means staying a virgin.

Where do you feel unsafe as a woman?

Frankly, I feel safe as a woman 99% of the time. Yes, there are places when I am uncomfortable walking on the street alone at night, but I feel afraid as a person, not a woman. It has nothing to do with what’s between my legs.

Where is somewhere you can exist without fear?

I can exist almost everywhere without fear. I don’t experience a lot of the daily harassment women write about on the internet. I wonder sometimes if it’s because I’m immune to it, rather than that it doesn’t exist.

Do women treat you differently than men?

Without making a very, very broad generalization, no, women do not treat me differently than men. My interactions with various people are different because people are different, not because of gender.

In what ways does being a woman make you vulnerable or exposed?

There will always be bad guys in the world. But I don’t feel vulnerable or exposed because I don’t allow myself to be a victim.

Would you consider yourself a feminist?

Yes, definitely.

How do you define feminism?

Feminism is a woman’s right to choose.

What do you think are positive ways the world views women?

There are places in the world where women are viewed as having the same intellectual capacity and social rights as men. There are also places where women are viewed as mothers and familial caretakers, and this can also be positive, because it gives them value.

What are negative?

There are places in the world where women are viewed as inherently less smart and less valuable than men. There are places where women are viewed as male property.

Do you think the world’s perception of women limits or benefits them?

I think that all depends on geographical location.

What is your relationship to sex?

I have a very intimate relationship with sex. It is an important part of my life professionally and personally.

How do you define sex?

I define sex as anything from a penis in a vagina, to a man pretending to be a puppy, to a woman bouncing on balloons. The answer to this question is very conditional to me. What is completely inane to one person is the most sexually arousing thing to another.

I define sex as anything from a penis in a vagina, to a man pretending to be a puppy, to a woman bouncing on balloons. The answer to this question is very conditional to me. What is completely inane to one person is the most sexually arousing thing to another.

What does a sexual relationship mean to you?

A sexual relationship is a relationship with someone that you are having sex with. To me, it has nothing to do with intimacy. I have many sexual relationships; I have one every time I go to work. But I only have one intimate relationship, and that is with my partner.

Do you feel comfortable communicating your sexual needs to a partner?

Yes, this is something I pride myself on. It is also something I believe all women should strive for.

Have you found a balance of fulfillment with your partners?

Yes. I am not interested in being with someone where we don’t have a balance of fulfillment.

Do you feel that your desires are marginalized in the bedroom or are less important, if so why do you think that is?

My desires in the bedroom are only marginalized when I want them to be.

Are you fearful of being openly sexual for fear of judgment?

No. My sexuality is a part of who I am, and if people don’t like it, that is their problem.

Have you ever been in a position where your sexuality was used against you?

No.

When you imagine sex, what is the visual/feeling you associate with it?

Sex, to me, is an innate human behaviour. It only elicits positive feelings, and feelings of curiosity.

What are your feelings on sex work(ers)?

As a sex worker, it’s impossible for me to make a general statement about sex workers as a whole, because I see them as individuals. What I can say is that not all sex workers are the stereotype people want to believe. Many of us are college educated, feminists, and absolutely love what we do.

"(N)ot all sex workers are the stereotype people want to believe. Many of us are college educated, feminists, and absolutely love what we do." -Casey Photo by Jennifer Toole

“(N)ot all sex workers are the stereotype people want to believe. Many of us are college educated, feminists, and absolutely love what we do.” -Casey
Photo by Jennifer Toole

Is sex empowering for you?

Yes. It is one of the ways I express myself on a regular basis.

Is sex embarrassing for you to discuss?

Nope. It’s a topic that I enjoy talking about.

What do you seek through sex?

That depends on the situation. Sometimes it’s a physical release, sometimes it’s an emotional release. Sometimes it’s a way to push my body, a way to explore myself. And sometimes it’s for a paycheck. Sometimes all of the above.

Is there anyone in your world you undermine your principles for?

No. That is something I refuse to do.

In which situations do you feel safe to speak your mind/stand up for yourself?

I’m can’t think of a situation in my life right now where I would be afraid to stand up for myself.

How do you feel about the media’s portrayal of women?

I feel like there are some forms of media that do a much better job of portraying women than others. Just as a small example, I believe that women are portrayed much more realistically in cable dramas than network dramas. I also believe that consumers are demanding a more accurate portrayal, and this is pushing trends in the right direction.

Are you satisfied with the women you see depicted in film, television & advertising?

Overall, yes, I am satisfied. It’s nowhere near perfect, but it’s quickly moving in the right direction, especially in film and television.

How do you maintain a sense of self?

I maintain a sense of self by maintaining a balance in my life. I work hard and I love my job, but I make sure to find time to spend with my partner, time to spend with friends, and time just for myself.

What is something you deeply love about yourself?

My strength – both physically and emotionally.

Who are/what are your biggest motivators?

My biggest motivator is myself. I’m a perfectionist to a fault, and I hate settling for anything less than my best.

Do you have people you look up to?

Yes, I have many people I look up to. The first person that comes to mind is always Nina Hartley. I admire her professional adult career (which is going on 30+ years), her sex education pursuits, and the way she handles her personal relationships. I admire her intellect, her confidence, and her dedication.

"If feminism is a woman’s right to choose – a woman’s right to be her own woman – who says I can’t be confident and sexy, and choose to fuck on camera? " -Casey Photo by Jennifer Toole

“If feminism is a woman’s right to choose – a woman’s right to be her own woman – who says I can’t be confident and sexy, and choose to fuck on camera? ” -Casey
Photo by Jennifer Toole

Anything else you’d like to add?

There are many people out there who think that feminism and porn are total opposites. To me, they go hand in hand. Managing my brand, being creative, sharing my sexuality with the world – these things are empowering to me. No one ever forces me to do anything I don’t want to do. If feminism is a woman’s right to choose – a woman’s right to be her own woman – who says I can’t be confident and sexy, and choose to fuck on camera? ~